Research

 

Survey Results

Benefits for Educators

88% agree that Brain Power helped them with classroom management

94% agree that Brain Power helped them connect with their students

93% agree that Brain Power exercises helped them manage the stress of teaching

97% agree that Brain Power exercises helped them stay positive in the classroom

What Educators See in Their Students

94% agree that Brain Power is a helpful tool for creating a positive classroom atmosphere

98% agree that Brain Power helped their students stay more engaged in class

95% agree that Brain Power helped their students with their emotional regulation

96% agree that Brain Power helped their students with their focus

What Students Say About Brain Power

98% agree that they like to do Brain Power activities in class

83% agree that Brain Power exercises helped them with their concentration

85% agree that Brain Power has helped them enjoy school more

77% agree that Brain Power has helped them with friendships in school

80% agree that Brain Power has given them tools to change their emotions from negative to positive

 

Social-Emotional Wellness

Dec. 2015: 180 at-risk middle school students from District 7 in the Bronx received an 8-week pilot Brain Power project that consisted of weekly 45-minute classes and two full-day Leadership Programs.

 

Pre-Test Results place the average student on the borderline for the category “clinically significant problems may be present” for all four SDQ* indicators: Emotional Symptoms, Conduct Problems, Hyperactivity and Peer Problems.

 

Post-Test Results place the average student into the “Normal” category, or “clinically significant problems in this area are unlikely” for all four SDQ* indicators.

 

  • Emotional Symptoms – The pre-test results depict an average student score of 40% on questions such as “I am nervous in new situations” or “I have many fears.” Upon project completion, the average student reported a 75% decrease in this scale, with an average post-test score of 10%.
     

  • Conduct Problems – The pre-test results depict an average student score of 30% on questions such as “I fight a lot” or “I take things that are not mine.” Upon completion of the project, the average student reported a 67% decrease in this scale, with an average post-test score of 10%.
     

  • Hyperactivity – The pre-test results depict an average student score of 40% on questions such as “I am easily distracted” or “I am constantly fidgeting”. Upon completion of the project, the average student reported a 50% decrease in this scale, with an average post-test score of 20%.
     

  • Peer Problems – The pre-test results depict an average student score of 30% on questions such as “Other students my age pick on me” or “I am usually on my own.” Upon completion of the project, the average student reported a 67% decrease in this scale, with an average post-test score of 10%.

Dec. 2015: 180 at-risk middle school students from District 7 in the Bronx received an 8-week pilot Brain Power project that consisted of weekly 45-minute classes and two full-day Leadership Programs.

Pre-Test Results place the average student on the borderline for the category “clinically significant problems may be present” for pro-social behaviors, as indicated by the Strength and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ)*.

 

Post-Test Results place the average student into the “Normal” category, or “clinically significant problems in this area are unlikely” for pro-social behaviors.

 

The pre-test results depict an average student score of 60% on questions such as “I try to be nice to other people” or “I am helpful if someone is hurt.” Upon completion of the project, the average student reported a 50% increase in this scale. This resulted in an average post-test student score of 90%.

*The Strength and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ) is a brief behavioral screening questionnaire that asks about 25 attributes, some positive and others negative. The 25 items are divided between 5 scales of 5 items each, generating scores for conduct problems, hyperactivity, emotional symptoms, peer problems and prosocial behaviors. The reliability and validity of the SDQ make it a useful brief measure of the adjustment and psychopathology of children and adolescents.

Source: Psychometric Properties of the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire. GOODMAN, ROBERT.  Journal of the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry, Volume 40 , Issue 11 , 1337 - 1345

 

Neuroplasticity

June 2017: 4th graders from three schools in Baldwin, Long Island completed a pre and post test for the Strengths & Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ), a brief behavioral screening assessment. During the pilot, Lenox students received 8 weeks of Brain Power training. Steele students received 8 weeks of training from another mindfulness program. Brookside students did not receive any additional program.

  • Declines in negative social-emotional indicators such as Peer Problems are indicative of improvement. The larger the decline, the bigger the decrease in Peer Problems.
     

  • 11% more Lenox students answered “Certainly True” or “Somewhat True” on the Post SDQ to question #15: “Other people my age generally like me,” while 3% fewer students from both Steele and Brookside selected these responses to this question on the Post SDQ.

  • Declines in negative social-emotional indicators such as Conduct Problems are indicative of improvement. The larger the decline, the bigger the decrease in Conduct Problems.
     

  • 45% fewer Lenox students selected either “Certainly True” or “Somewhat True” on the Post SDQ for Question 12: "I fight a lot.  I can make other people do what I want," while Steele had 20% more students and Brookside had 12.5% more students select “Certainly True” or “Somewhat True” on the Post SDQ for this question.

 

Mindfulness

June 2017: 4th graders from three schools in Baldwin, Long Island completed a pre and post test for the Strengths & Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ), a brief behavioral screening assessment. During the pilot, Lenox students received 8 weeks of Brain Power training. Steele students received 8 weeks of training from another mindfulness program. Brookside students did not receive any additional program.

  • Declines in negative social-emotional indicators such as Emotional Problems are indicative of improvement. The larger the decline, the bigger the decrease in Emotional Problems.
     

  • For Lenox, there was a 30% increase in the number of students who selected "Not True" on the Post SDQ for Question 8: "I often get nervous before tests.” For Steele, there was a 36% decrease and for Brookside a 10% decrease in the number of students who selected “Not True” on the Post SDQ for this question. 

  • Declines in negative social-emotional indicators such as Hyperactivity are indicative of improvement. The larger the decline, the bigger the decrease in Hyperactivity.
     

  • 47% more Lenox students selected “Certainly True” on the Post SDQ for Question 16:  "When I lose focus I am good at regaining my focus," while Steele had only 15% more students and Brookside had 22% fewer students selecting “Certainly True” on the Post SDQ for this question.

All mindfulness programs are not created equal.

These studies show that Brain Power is at least 2 times more effective than other Mindfulness programs.

 

Academic Success

Recall, Information Processing, Sequential & Quantitative Reasoning

In the spring of 2015, A Brain Education pilot study was conducted at a Charter School in Arizona.

 

The 4th grade class was split into a test group and a control group through random selection. The class was then assessed using the Differential Ability Scales II (DAS II). The test group received 45 minute BE sessions 3 times a week for 6 weeks. The 4th grade class was then re-assessed with the DAS II. Pre-test and post-test results were analyzed and averaged to identify an increase or decrease in three specific measures. While both groups demonstrated an increase, the test group clearly outperformed the control group. 

In addition to our own research above, please reference the following scholarly articles and studies which further explain the benefits of mindfulness, neuroplasticity and social-emotional wellness:

  1. “Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire.”  Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire. Retrieved 10 July 2015.
     

  2. Roemer, L., Williston, S. K., & Rollins, L. G. (2015). Mindfulness and emotion regulation. Current Opinion in Psychology, 3, 52–57.
     

  3. Ortner, C. N., Kilner, S. J., & Zelazo, P. D. (2007). Mindfulness meditation and reduced emotional interference on a cognitive task. Motivation and Emotion, 31(4), 271–283.
     

  4. 10 Lutz, A., Slagter, H. A., Dunne, J. D., & Davidson, R. J. (2008). Attention regulation and monitoring in meditation. Trends in Cognitive Sciences, 12(4), 163–169.
     

  5. Condon, P., Desbordes, G., Miller, W. B., & DeSteno, D. (2013). Meditation increases compassionate responses to suffering. Psychological Science, 24(10), 2125–2127.
     

  6. Roeser, R., Schonert-Reichl, K. A., Jha, A., Cullen, M., Wallace, L., Wilensky, R., … Harrison, J. (2013). Mindfulness training and reductions in teacher stress and burnout: Results from two randomized, waitlist-control field trials. Journal of Educational Psychology, 105(3), 787–804.
     

  7. Schonert-Reichl, K. A., Oberle, E., Lawlor, M. S., Abbott, D., Thomson, K., Oberlander, T. F., & Diamond, A. (2015). Enhancing cognitive and social–emotional development through a simple-to-administer mindfulness-based school program for elementary school children: A randomized controlled trial. Developmental Psychology, 51(1), 52-66.
     

  8. Semple, R. J., Lee, J., Rosa, D., & Miller, L. F. (2010). A randomized trial of mindfulness-based cognitive therapy for children: promoting mindful attention to enhance social-emotional resiliency in children. Journal of Child and Family Studies, 19(2), 218–229.
     

  9. Jones, D. E., Greenberg, M., & Crowley, M. (2015). Early Social-Emotional Functioning and Public Health: The Relationship Between Kindergarten Social Competence and Future Wellness. American Journal of Public Health, 105(11), 2283–2290.
     

  10. Baijal, S., Jha, A. P., Kiyonaga, A., Singh, R., & Srinivasan, N. (2011). The influence of concentrative meditation training on the development of attention networks during early adolescence. Frontiers in Psychology, 2, 1-9.
     

  11. Jennings, P. A., Frank, J. L., Snowberg, K. E., Coccia, M. A., & Greenberg, M. T. (2013). Improving Classroom Learning Environments by Cultivating Awareness and Resilience in Education (CARE): Results of a Randomized Controlled Trial. School Psychology Quarterly, 28(4), 374–390.
     

  12. Barnes, V. A., Davis, H. C., Murzynowski, J. B., & Treiber, F. A. (2004). Impact of meditation on resting and ambulatory blood pressure and heart rate in youth. Psychosomatic Medicine, 66(6), 909-914.
     

  13. Sibinga, E. M. S., Webb, L., Ghazarian, S. R., & Ellen, J. M. (2016). School-Based Mindfulness Instruction: An RCT. Pediatrics, 137(1), 1-8.
     

  14. Raes, F., Griffith, J. W., Van der Gucht, K., & Williams, J. M. G. (2014). School-based prevention and reduction of depression in adolescents: A cluster-randomized controlled trial of a mindfulness group program. Mindfulness, 5(5), 477–486.
     

  15. Tschannen-Moran, M., & Hoy, A. W. (2001). Teacher efficacy: Capturing an elusive construct. Teaching and Teacher Education, 17(7), 783–805.
     

  16. Raes, F., Pommier, E., Neff, K. D., & Van Gucht, D. (2011). Construction and factorial validation of a short form of the self-compassion scale. Clinical Psychology & Psychotherapy, 18(3), 250–255.
     

  17. Vimont, C.  (2008)  How to fight stress and ward off illness:  What you can do to protect yourself.  National Institutes of Health Medline Plus Magazine, 3(1), 5-6.
     

  18. Non AL, Rewak M, Kawachi I, Gilman SE, Loucks EB, Appleton AA, Roman JC, Buka SL, Kubzansky LD. (2014) Childhood social disadvantage, cardiometabolic risk, and chronic disease in adulthood. American Journal of Epidemiology, 180(3):263-71.
     

  19. Pulkki-Raback L, Elovainio M, Hakulinen C, Hintsanen M, Jokela M, Kubzansky LD, Hintsa T, Serlachius A, Laitnen T, Pahkala K, Mikkila V, Hutri-Kahonen N, Juonala M, Viikari J, Raitakai O, Keltikangas-Jarvinen L. (2015) Cumulative effect of Childhood Psychosocial Factors on Ideal Cardiovascular Health in Adulthood: Young Finns Prospective Cohort Study. Circulation. 131(3), 245-53.
     

  20. Butzer B, LoRusso AM, Windsor R, Riley F, Frame K, Khalsa SBS, Conboy L (2017) A Qualitative examination of yoga for middle school adolescents. Advances in School Mental Health Promotion, 10(3), 195-219.